'Hot Spots' Ride a Merry-Go-Round on Jupiter
Previous
RANDOM
Curiosity Mars Rover Sees Trend in Water Presence
Next

New Panorama Photo From NASA Mars Rover Shows 18,000 Foot Tall Mountain, Mount Sharp

by William W. on March 15, 2013
NASA

Rising above the present location of NASA‘s Mars rover Curiosity, higher than any mountain in the 48 contiguous states of the United States, Mount Sharp is featured in new imagery from the rover.

A pair of mosaics assembled from dozens of telephoto images shows Mount Sharp in dramatic detail. The component images were taken by the 100-millimeter-focal-length telephoto lens camera mounted on the right side of Curiosity’s remote sensing mast, during the 45th Martian day of the rover’s mission on Mars (Sept. 20, 2012).

This layered mound, also called Aeolis Mons, in the center of Gale Crater rises more than 3 miles (5 kilometers) above the crater floor location of Curiosity. Lower slopes of Mount Sharp remain a destination for the mission, though the rover will first spend many more weeks around a location called “Yellowknife Bay,” where it has found evidence of a past environment favorable for microbial life.

PIA16768_modest

A version of the mosaic that has been white-balanced to show the terrain as if under Earthlike lighting, which makes the sky look overly blue, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16768. White-balanced versions help scientists recognize rock materials based on their terrestrial experience. The Martian sky would look like more of a butterscotch color to the human eye. A version of the mosaic with raw color, as a typical smart-phone camera would show the scene, is at http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA16769.

In both versions, the sky has been filled out by extrapolating color and brightness information from the portions of the sky that were captured in images of the terrain.

NASA’s Mars Science Laboratory project is using Curiosity and the rover’s 10 science instruments to investigate environmental history within Gale Crater, a location where the project has found that conditions were long ago favorable for microbial life.

Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, built and operates the Mast Camera (Mastcam) instrument. NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Mars Science Laboratory mission for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington, and built the rover.

For more information about the mission, visit http://www.nasa.gov/msl and http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl.

Follow the mission on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/marscuriosity and on Twitter athttp://www.twitter.com/marscuriosity.

William W.
I am an amateur astronomer with a focus on astrophotography and deep space objects. I have 15+ years in the web publishing business and over 20 years as a space enthusiast. I enjoy reading and writing about the amazing discoveries of brilliant scientists and engineers.
 
READ MORE

Telsa Motors Launches Battery Swap Pilot Program

 
READ MORE

SpaceX Completes First Milestone for Commercial Crew Transportation System

 
READ MORE

NASA Awards SpaceX Launch of Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite


 
READ MORE

NASA Rover Finds Active and Ancient Organic Chemistry on Mars

 
READ MORE

Venus Express goes gently into the night

 
READ MORE

NASA’s MAVEN Mission Identifies Links in Chain Leading to Atmospheric Loss


 
READ MORE

NASA Tests Software That May Help Increase Flight Efficiency, Decrease Aircraft Noise

 
READ MORE

SpaceX set to create 300 new US jobs

 
READ MORE

Lockheed Martin Wins Medium Lift Contract in Alaska


 
READ MORE

Arianespace’s upcoming Soyuz mission receives its “identity” at the Spaceport

 
READ MORE

U.S. Geological Survey releases highest-resolution geologic map of Mars

 
READ MORE

NASA All About That Space – All About That Bass Parody Music Video


 
READ MORE

Warm Gas Pours ‘Cold Water’ on Galaxy’s Star-Making

 
READ MORE

Scientists Warn That Cosmic Rays Will Threaten Future Deep-Space Astronaut Missions

 
READ MORE

New Horizons Pluto probe wakes up after 1,873 days in hybernation


Load More
End of the line!
Fonts by Google Fonts. Icons by Fontello. Full Credits here »